Quest Quips

blog devoted to CNN International Business anchor, Richard Quest, who looks like a cross between Roger Daltry and a Muppet. You have to see him to believe him...

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Friday, December 26, 2003
 
What about the Figgy Pudding?

o well, we here at Quest Quips hope you had some happy holidays and wish you a happy New Year! Liz clippped this for us and i'm posting it. Thanks, Liz.



AMERICAN MORNING
A Look at Traditional English Christmas
Aired December 25, 2003 - 07:38 ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND
MAY BE
UPDATED.

JACK CAFFERTY, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Time now for one of our most popular
features on AMERICAN MORNING, no matter what time of the year it is.
It's a fairly
regularly scheduled trip across the Atlantic to London and my pal
Richard
Quest. He's over there this morning and he's going to tell us a little
about
how they do a traditional English Christmas -- Richard, nice to have
you with
us. Merry Christmas. What have you got?

RICHARD QUEST, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Season's greetings to you, Jack. Now
then,
what is one of those? Hah! No, it's not an implement that should be
used
somewhere else. It is a Christmas cracker, the sort of thing that you
pull on
Christmas lunch. Now, normally you pull it with a friend. Well, I
managed to
find one friend -- you couldn't be here to join me, so I'm joined by
one of my
colleagues, Diana. Now, look at this. We're now going to -- this is how
you
do it. This is the thing. You basically pull the Christmas cracker. I
lost.
But never mind. For the purposes of this I won.

CAFFERTY: Wow. Now, what's in there after you bust it apart?

QUEST: I've had to break another one. What you've basically got in here
is a
little bit of a present.

CAFFERTY: OK.

QUEST: A glow in the dark, a cheap little nasty toy.

CAFFERTY: OK.

QUEST: This is what you really want, though, Jack. This.

CAFFERTY: Well, now that -- that adds a little something, Richard. Much
better.

QUEST: All right, now, and a joke. Here we go. Are you ready for this,
Jack?
Why is the sky so high?

CAFFERTY: I don't know.

QUEST: So that the birds don't bump their heads.

CAFFERTY: Good answer.

QUEST: Right. Now, with all of this, you need some food.

CAFFERTY: OK.

QUEST: What, forget that -- you have turkey on Thanksgiving, we have
turkey
on Christmas Day. But then afterwards, bring on the dessert. Diana's
doing
sterling service here. It's amazing what you can get these days. Look
at these
two, Jack. This is a Christmas pudding. Times are hard at Time Warner,
so
we've only managed to buy one minced pie.

CAFFERTY: I was going to say, there's not much food there.

QUEST: Well, you know, shareholders and profits, don't you know?

CAFFERTY: Oh, yes.

QUEST: This is the big one because what you do here is you pour brandy
over
it, heat it up, set it on fire. And minced pies, which are a peculiar
British-English thing. There's no mince meat in them. It's actually
just fruit. And
that's what people eat. So, now, Jack, I've got me hat, I've got me
Christmas
pudding, I've got me minced pie, now I'm ready. It's three o'clock
Christmas
afternoon.

CAFFERTY: OK.

QUEST: Time for Her Majesty to call on.

CAFFERTY: Right. Every year the queen gives...

QUEST: Is that it?

CAFFERTY: Yes. She gives a Christmas message every year. I am familiar
with
that. What's she going to talk about?

QUEST: Well, we never really know what the queen is going to say. I can
guarantee she will be telling us to count our blessings. There will
also, no
doubt, be a healthy dose of, "It has been an eventful year," and,
finally, I can
guarantee, Jack, she will wish us all a very happy Christmas.

CAFFERTY: Merry Christmas to you, Richard Quest. And don't forget to
take
the hat off before you leave the building.

QUEST: Thank you, Jack.

CAFFERTY: All right.